From Sonic the Hedgehog to Star Wars, are fans too entitled?

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Spectrum
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From Sonic the Hedgehog to Star Wars, are fans too entitled?

Post by Spectrum » Fri Feb 14, 2020 2:15 pm

Just read this BBC article and had a bit of a whiplash. The start of it is pretty good, very well written and balanced, looking at the investment of fandom in a positive light.... and then it starts discussing Star Wars and goes all intersectionality.

http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/202002 ... o-entitled
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Neo-Paladin
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Re: From Sonic the Hedgehog to Star Wars, are fans too entitled?

Post by Neo-Paladin » Fri Feb 14, 2020 3:19 pm

Phew...you're right, started decent, then veered way off course.
No, fans are not too entitled. People who pay money and invest time in something are entitled to being given something WORTH their time and money. Not something half-baked, not something thrown together hastily without a single idea where to go with it, not something that tramples all over what previous works in the same canon have established.
Something with a decent vision behind it and something showing that those people who in the end are paying for it all are being respected.
That is all. It's that simple. And, just like many others, I am tired of being told to swallow whatever garbage is being thrown at the screen because it's got women or POC or LGBTQ+ people in it.
Be diverse all you want! Please! Sure thing! But it is NOT something to be used as a shield against criticisms because the studios are creatively bankrupt.

mrdent12
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Re: From Sonic the Hedgehog to Star Wars, are fans too entitled?

Post by mrdent12 » Fri Feb 14, 2020 3:48 pm

So what I am reqding is that studios and creatives want to be treated differently from everyone else in that the audience should adapt to them even if the audience has no appetite for it. In the business world, your customer drives requirements not the business. Even Apple did extensive user checking during the design phase for their stuff. I see no reason studios should get a pass just because they are "woke" or "creative geniuses".

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Ares
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Re: From Sonic the Hedgehog to Star Wars, are fans too entitled?

Post by Ares » Fri Feb 14, 2020 5:57 pm

Image

The short answer: No.

The long answer: Hell f***ing no.

I will say that the article does a decent job of examining things . . . right up to the point where you hit "when fans bite back". After which it turns into a dumpster fire parroting the same old drivel. Once you get to:
Yet it would be naive to think that the backlash against The Last Jedi – and indeed, against Tran – were motivated purely by a dislike of storytelling choices.
They have officially jumped ship to crazy town. They even use old chestnuts like "Kelly Marie Tran was harassed off of social media by racists" when that's never been proven and she's made no statements to that effect. Out come the accusations that the only reason you could have had a problem with The Last Jedi or Ghostbustes 2016 was because of racism or misogyny. Meanwhile Princess Leia, Lando Calrissian and Winston Zedmore are standing over there with the "Am I a joke to you" meme as they stare in disbelief.

Intersectionality is basically being used as a shield against criticism. Which is mindboggling because the FIRST THING they taught me in my Freshman level writing class ( . . . way back in 1999 . . . damn it) was that If you have an idea, and you keep it to yourself, then you can consider that idea perfect. But the second you share it with anyone, no matter how many, you are opening yourself up to criticism. You need to learn to take criticism, process it, and use it as a means to see how you can improve. Not all criticism need be given equal weight, but there's a world of difference between someone who says "this sucks" and someone who can give you a well explained reason for their dislikes.

Being able to brush off criticisms as "racist", "mysognist" or similar things is just a way to deflect from the idea that you screwed up. It gets even more hilarious with films like Ghostbusters 2016, Terminator Dark Fate and Charlies Angels. When you use the promotional material vilifying a section of the viewing audience, telling them the film isn't for them, calling them manbabies for their criticisms, you cannot complain that they didn't show up to watch your film.

The article calls the fans entitled, but it sounds like the studios, directors and actors feel entitled to fan money when they haven't earned it.

With fandoms, the whole point of continuing to make something with an existing property is because it already has a built in fanbase. If you want to make an original property like John Wick or Pacific Rim, there is no existing fanbase and you can do whatever you want. But if you use an existing property, one reason you're doing it is because they already have an existing fanbase. Which means there were things about that property that people loved, there was a history, there were rules, there are expectations. And if you mess with those expectations (dare I say, "subvert them"), you run the risk of alienating the people that made the property profitable.

Imagine being a pizza place, and you have a regular customer who goes every Tuesday an orders a pepperoni pizza. Then he comes in one week and when he gets his pizza it tastes different. The way they've prepared it is completely different, they use a different cheese and bread, different tomato sauce, etc. When he asks why they changed it, they said they wanted to try something new to broaden their audience. The guy shrugs and eats the pizza, but it both looks and tastes different, enough to throw things off and hamper his enjoyment.

Next week when he comes in and orders a pepperoni pizza he gets a vegetables lovers. When asked why he got this, they say that they subverted his expectations and gave him this brand new thing to try. He asks them for what he ordered, and they get offended that he won't accept what they gave him. He leaves without eating the pizza.

A couple weeks later he comes back, tries to order a pepperoni, and again gets a different pizza. When he complains that it isn't what he ordered, they call him a racist, homophobe and sexist because the cook that prepared it is a gay woman of color. The guy leaves and never comes back, and leaves a negative review on their website. He's then hounded on social media and used as an example of toxicity and prejudice within the pizza fanbase.

One reviewer I really enjoy is sfDebris, a reviewer of movies, tv shows, cartoons and video games. On the subject of the Transformers, he took a moment to talk about the idea of "fan entitlement", with people acting like the fans own part of the franchise. Chuck (his real name) said simply that he doesn't own any of the franchise itself, but he does own how it makes him feel, and he's going to have opinions based on that, and trying to deny them is true undeserved entitlement.

mrdent12
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Re: From Sonic the Hedgehog to Star Wars, are fans too entitled?

Post by mrdent12 » Fri Feb 14, 2020 6:24 pm

I'd argue the fans do have some ownership stake in a sense. While not creating the work or providing initial funding, no one is going to pay for creative work that isn't viable commercialy. Pet projects funded by people with money to burn is a different story.

Area cover it well with his pizza example, but I'd add fans have ownership in the commercial creative stuff during the financing phase for established legacies by virtue of being baked into the sells pitch. Even for things like Pacific Rim, there is some group who likes giant robots fighting monsters that are built into the sells pitch.

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Re: From Sonic the Hedgehog to Star Wars, are fans too entitled?

Post by FuzzyBoots » Fri Feb 14, 2020 6:35 pm

{nods} And I think that part of the problem is that we're talking about a spectrum (no, not Spectrum. Hi!). Leaving one bad review based on your experience is a pretty clear-cut case of something people are entitled to. Yes, enough people posting reviews that Rise of the Robots has some non-so-subtle anti-meat rhetoric can impact sales by discouraging others, but it's an honest opinion expressed freely. And honestly, I think it's OK even if people don't have good reasons, like if they don't want to support that film because the director is German, or because the lead actress's father was recently proven to have molested young actors, and they don't want money going to anyone in that family. Hopefully, the aggregate of humanity is more rational.

A fairly clearcut case of where it goes wrong is someone trying to impose their opinion against others, say burning down theaters that show the movie, or attempting to use a bot to spam bad reviews. Whether one feels they are in the right or not, that's clearly a bad action.

Where it gets a bit murkier is in trying to rally/organize people to oppose it. On the surface level, yes, it's still individuals acting individually with an aggregate result, but mobs are mobs, and it's demonstrably easy to sway people into picking up pitchforks and torches, and stirring them into that bad actor category of trying to impose one's opinions.

To use the pizza example, leaving a bad review is fine. Burning down the pizza shop or poisoning their sauce is not. Getting a group of friends to picket the restaurant to discourage people from entering is heading toward bad actor territory.

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Re: From Sonic the Hedgehog to Star Wars, are fans too entitled?

Post by Spectrum » Fri Feb 14, 2020 6:41 pm

... but trying to protect other people from the horrible indigestion that the pizza caused?

Oooof, should not have done that last night.
We rise from the ashes so that new legends can be born.

FuzzyBoots
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Re: From Sonic the Hedgehog to Star Wars, are fans too entitled?

Post by FuzzyBoots » Fri Feb 14, 2020 6:56 pm

Spectrum wrote:
Fri Feb 14, 2020 6:41 pm
... but trying to protect other people from the horrible indigestion that the pizza caused?

Oooof, should not have done that last night.
Yeah, that's another large grey area. When are you obliged to step in for the sake of others? If you believe there is genuine harm being done, are you obliged to at least inform others (such as the protestors around abortion clinics who hand out pamphlets but don't actually bar entry) or are you obliged to act more directly?

Spectrum
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Re: From Sonic the Hedgehog to Star Wars, are fans too entitled?

Post by Spectrum » Fri Feb 14, 2020 7:09 pm

Stretching the analogy even further..

Better than the Jem movie. They took reviews from when the pizza was the best in town, really the greatest ingredients, high quality stuff. Sure, it was a different time and people had different expectations. Then they sell a freezer burned off brand Hot Pocket based on the reviews.
We rise from the ashes so that new legends can be born.

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Ares
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Re: From Sonic the Hedgehog to Star Wars, are fans too entitled?

Post by Ares » Tue Feb 18, 2020 3:54 pm

Ares wrote:
Fri Feb 14, 2020 5:57 pm

Imagine being a pizza place, and you have a regular customer who goes every Tuesday an orders a pepperoni pizza. Then he comes in one week and when he gets his pizza it tastes different. The way they've prepared it is completely different, they use a different cheese and bread, different tomato sauce, etc. When he asks why they changed it, they said they wanted to try something new to broaden their audience. The guy shrugs and eats the pizza, but it both looks and tastes different, enough to throw things off and hamper his enjoyment.

Next week when he comes in and orders a pepperoni pizza he gets a vegetables lovers. When asked why he got this, they say that they subverted his expectations and gave him this brand new thing to try. He asks them for what he ordered, and they get offended that he won't accept what they gave him. He leaves without eating the pizza.

A couple weeks later he comes back, tries to order a pepperoni, and again gets a different pizza. When he complains that it isn't what he ordered, they call him a racist, homophobe and sexist because the cook that prepared it is a gay woman of color. The guy leaves and never comes back, and leaves a negative review on their website. He's then hounded on social media and used as an example of toxicity and prejudice within the pizza fanbase.
To elaborate on this metaphor:

If the guy going to the pizza place has this bad experience, leaves his negative review on the website, but then that's the end of the story, then I'd agree he doesn't have any right to protest outside the pizza place, sue them or any similar things. He would be well within his right to bring them up in conversation and warn his friends against going there, or even posting about them on Reddit or message boards because it's an interesting story.

That last line is important though. If after receiving that negative review the guy gets slandered by the pizza place as a bigot, if they try to dox him, get media sites to release hit pieces on him, point to him as everything wrong with pizza eaters and similar things, then I feel the guy would be well within his rights to protest the place, to start a website countering their claims, or doing whatever he has to to fight back.

When you're unsatisfied with what you get and the other side escalates things, you aren't out of line in defending yourself and using appropriate responses to try and defend your choices and your good name.

The whole Sonic vs Birds of Prey thing is a perfect example. The Sonic team listened to the fans and have released a film that is doing very well in the box office. It's done more in its opening weekend that Birds of Prey's entire run thus far. Birds of Prey is suffering a lack of attendance due to the R-Rating (any of the teenager or younger Harley fans can't see it), the promotional material, and some choice words from the cast. So the people that didn't go see Birds of Prey are being slandered for not supporting it, while also decrying people for going see Sonic instead, like it was some kind of binary choice of see one or the other. I saw both Into the Spider-Verse and Aquaman despite them being within a week or so of each other, I also saw Alita and Captain Marvel despite people trying to make that into an either/or thing as well.

Of all the entitlement on display, I find the biggest group of entitled people are some folks in the film industry and the media, who feel a movie is entitled to a certain amount of success instead of earning it.

Neo-Paladin
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Re: From Sonic the Hedgehog to Star Wars, are fans too entitled?

Post by Neo-Paladin » Tue Feb 18, 2020 6:18 pm

Ares wrote:
Tue Feb 18, 2020 3:54 pm
Of all the entitlement on display, I find the biggest group of entitled people are some folks in the film industry and the media, who feel a movie is entitled to a certain amount of success instead of earning it.
This. A thousand times this. They somehow got it into their heads that being " progressive" (how progresssive you actually are if you have to parade your minorities around like circus freaks to garner attention is a wholy different animal) would automatically ensure a movie's success. When that does not work, a scapegoat must be found...

Nope, if you want our money, you have to earn it. Earn it by giving us good entertainment. You can even be artistic, subvert expectations, all that newfangled stuff that makes you feel so damn smart. Just make sure that at its core, your work is good and respects its audience. That's really all you need to do.

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