Jab's Builds! (Mufasa! Hyenas! Scar! Bonkers! Pocahontas!)

Where in all of your character write ups will go.
Jabroniville
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Re: Jab's Builds! (Shadow Knight! Disney Builds! Snow White! The Evil Queen!)

Post by Jabroniville » Tue Aug 21, 2018 5:45 am

HalloweenJack wrote:
Mon Aug 20, 2018 10:25 pm
Heh. One thing I like about Pinocchio here is that scene where the boys are going to pleasure island and you get some great foreshadowing


The coach is pulled by donkeys and you can the sad expressions on their faces because they know they're pulling others to the same fate they're condemned to.
Roger Ebert has a great bit in his review of the film, stating "I wonder how many boys decided then and there to never smoke in their life", because the boys on Pleasure Island were seen smoking cigars as part of their bad behavior.

One of the more horrifying bits of that is how the boys were trapped as donkeys FOREVER, and never escaped. Like, THAT's a downer ending. Disney was definitely not afraid to get into some dark stuff back in the day.

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Re: Jab's Builds! (Shadow Knight! Disney Builds! Snow White! The Evil Queen!)

Post by Jabroniville » Tue Aug 21, 2018 5:51 am

Ken wrote:
Mon Aug 20, 2018 10:17 pm
Monstro terrified me as a child, and I never saw the movie! We had a record (LP) that had the story, and there was a booklet attached to the record jacket with images from the story.

We also had a story book with a non-Disney version. The cover had a multi-layered picture that looked 3-D.

And the insides were all photos of models/puppets. And again, Monstro terrified me. Basically, for years, any picture of a whale that took up most of a page would terrify me. I could read MOST of the encyclopedia article on whales (and did), but I couldn't read the first two pages. But my terror did turn into fascination (hence reading the encyclopedia article). I still have numerous books on the subject.
Funny thing is, I don't really recall being scared of Disney Movies as a child, even though I was a total chicken about stuff like that. I think the most fearful I ever got of a cartoon was that G.I. Joe episode where the guy was having snake-related nightmares, and imagined a GIGANTIC COBRA coming out to slaughter him. I think I had that on VHS, and always had to run to my mom when it was on.

Oddly, they don't really do "Big Terror" stuff like that anymore- they do more "Jump Scares", like the freaked-out guy in Zootopia. Or more "Real Fear" stuff like the sociopathy & controlling behavior of Mother Gothel & Hans.

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Re: Jab's Builds! (Shadow Knight! Disney Builds! Snow White! The Evil Queen!)

Post by Jabroniville » Tue Aug 21, 2018 6:51 am

Looking at which Disney movies come from other sources is interesting, because you can kind of see how influential the Disney version has become:

Disney's Is Most Popular, But Others Are Still Well-Known:
Snow White
Pinocchio
The Wind in the Willows
Cinderella
Peter Pan
Alice in Wonderland
The Jungle Book
Winnie the Pooh
The Little Mermaid
Beauty and the Beast
Aladdin
Pocahontas (true-ish story)
Mulan (true-ish story)
Tangled
Frozen (sort of; The Snow Queen is so different it's basically a different thing entirely)

"There's A Book?":
Dumbo
Bambi
Lady and the Tramp
101 Dalmatians
The Rescuers
The Fox & The Hound
The Black Cauldron
The Great Mouse Detective
Meet the Robinsons
Big Hero 6

Original:
(The Anthology Ones)
The Aristocats
The Lion King (well, SORT OF)
Dinosaur
Atlantis
Emperor's New Groove
Brother Bear
Lilo & Stitch
Home on the Range
Bolt
Wreck-It Ralph
Moana
Zootopia

The Original Is More Well-Known or Notable:
Sleepy Hollow
The Sword in the Stone
Robin Hood
Oliver & Company
The Hunchback of Notre Dame
Hercules
Tarzan
Treasure Planet
Chicken Little
The Princess and the Frog

I've noticed that they use original ideas MUCH more over the past two decades. There are actually more cases than I thought of people being more familiar with the original, but that's largely the case for mythological or ancient stories of true cultural icons (ain't nobody touching Hercules or Robin Hood, even with all of Disney's power). In some cases, it can be pretty close- Peter Pan & Alice in Wonderland are true cultural icons, and were famous for years beforehand... but the Disney version is still by far the most well-known and seen.

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Re: Jab's Builds! (Shadow Knight! Disney Builds! Snow White! The Evil Queen!)

Post by Jabroniville » Tue Aug 21, 2018 6:56 am

HalloweenJack wrote:
Mon Aug 20, 2018 9:19 pm
M4C8 wrote:
Mon Aug 20, 2018 2:45 pm
We didn't have the Disney Snow White on VHS when I was a kid, we did however have a live action Snow White movie that my sister watched a lot, it featured Diana Rigg as the Evil Queen. From what little I remember the Dwarfs had names like 'Iddy' and 'Biddy' and the evil Queen aged to dust and exploded at the end :)
totes remember that. I think it was one of the Cannon Films fairy tales. They did a Princess and the Frog style movie as well and I think a Hansel and Gretel one with Cloris Leachman as the witch
There's actually a LOT of companies out there still doing stuff like that. Since CGI is so much easier than Traditional Animation, there's been a huge influx of shovelware out there, with studios mimicking Disney in particular. One company released a Snow Queen movie right when Frozen hit big, and an Indian company changed their title from Super K to Kiara the BRAVE, with "Brave" in HUGE LETTERS, in a direct attempt at deception.

Since Disney adapts a lot of fairy tales on their own, there's not much they can do in a lot of cases. But man, if you start copying their versions a LITTLE too closely, they'll come straight for you.

Also, LOL- a friend sent me this via Facebook:
you didn't direct incredible 2 did you. because just saw it and the constant ass shots insane
of elastic girl

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Woodclaw
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Re: Jab's Builds! (Shadow Knight! Disney Builds! Snow White! The Evil Queen!)

Post by Woodclaw » Tue Aug 21, 2018 8:10 am

On the subject of Pinocchio, I'd like to contend that the Disney version (despite being very dark) it's still a far cry from the book. The initial intention of Collodi was to end the story with Pinocchio hanged from a oak tree after he escaped Mangiafuoco's (Stromboli's actual name in the book, it means "fire-eater") puppet theater and tried to take shelter in a house were everyone was already dead.
In a way the Diseny version took a lot of liberties. For example The Fairy was introduced only later in the story and at first acts as Pinocchio's older sister (at one point Pinocchio find her grave with the followin inscription "Here lies the blue haired girl, who died of sorrow after her brother Pinocchio run away") until at some point she reappear way older and become his surrogate mother... yeah that's not creepy at all.
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Jabroniville
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Re: Jab's Builds! (Shadow Knight! Disney Builds! Snow White! The Evil Queen!)

Post by Jabroniville » Tue Aug 21, 2018 8:36 am

Woodclaw wrote:
Tue Aug 21, 2018 8:10 am
On the subject of Pinocchio, I'd like to contend that the Disney version (despite being very dark) it's still a far cry from the book. The initial intention of Collodi was to end the story with Pinocchio hanged from a oak tree after he escaped Mangiafuoco's (Stromboli's actual name in the book, it means "fire-eater") puppet theater and tried to take shelter in a house were everyone was already dead.
In a way the Diseny version took a lot of liberties. For example The Fairy was introduced only later in the story and at first acts as Pinocchio's older sister (at one point Pinocchio find her grave with the followin inscription "Here lies the blue haired girl, who died of sorrow after her brother Pinocchio run away") until at some point she reappear way older and become his surrogate mother... yeah that's not creepy at all.
Oh yeah- the older stories are almost ALWAYS darker. I was reading up a bit on the story, and apparently Collodi had to re-do the ending at his editor's request, lest he bother too many people :).

The whole tale was to be a bit of a cautionary tale about being a douchey little brat. Pinocchio was also MUCH taller, being a long, thin marionette, not a cherubic little boy.

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Re: Fantasia

Post by FuzzyBoots » Tue Aug 21, 2018 9:47 am

Jabroniville wrote:
Tue Aug 21, 2018 3:34 am
Reception & Cultural Impact:
-Due to World War II, the feature actually lost money, but it was hailed by critics then and now as a masterpiece. And time and re-releases have been kind to it- adjusted for inflation, it's the #22 most-successful movie of all time in the US....
I still remember that our "Phar-Mor" (a retail chain along the lines of Wal-Mart that rather suddenly collapsed when it turned out they had some really shady retail practices that verged on a Ponzi scheme) had a VHS and NES rental section. They had a ridiculous number of copies of Fantasia, something like 27 of them, almost creating their own wall in the display.

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Dumbo

Post by Jabroniville » Tue Aug 21, 2018 8:18 pm

ImageImage

DUMBO (1941):
-Dumbo came on the heels of a couple of financial failures (Pinocchio & Fantasia), and so was one of the first Disney movies made "on the cheap". However, this cheapness in animation allowed the directors to focus on acting rather than showing off fancy backgrounds, and so we got one of the more personable tales. And this one's a doozy of an iconic film- is there any more tear-inducing scene in the movies than when Mrs. Jumbo cradles her son through the bars of her cage? Timothy the Mouse is a great advisor character (in that he's kind of bad at it at first), and it's got some FANTASTIC imagery, especially when Mrs. Jumbo razes the circus to the ground, or the famous Pink Elephants on Parade sequence, producing one of the greatest Acid Sequences in the history of film.

The sequence with the Black Crows is notorious for using racially-stereotyped dialogue (but in a more charming way than, say, Coal Black and De Sebben Dwarfs did at Warner), something that NO KID ever picks up on at first, and only became apparent to me later when I first heard the 1930s "black speech" stereotyped in other works and went "hey, but that's how those crows talkedOOHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!" Granted, these are some of the few good guys in the film, and it's pretty fair for its day.

Reception & Cultural Impact:
-Dumbo was actually a BIG hit for the studio, surprising a lot of people. John Lasseter comments how it has GREAT "Economy of Plot", being less than an hour long, but tells a complete tale with character development, emotional impact, and great scenery. It's one of the more cutesy films, but also contains a lot of darkness, sadness and weight. Sayings like "It was YOU all along!" have stood the test of time, and people still go on about Pink Elephants because of this one. A remake by Tim Burton is coming out in a couple of years, and the character appears in many Disney Parks as the infamous "circling fliers" ride. The ride is so infamously slow-loading (essentially having only a handful of Dumbos available for small groups) that they had to build TWO of them, and even still they're a big slog for most parents, who don't particularly care for the attraction.

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Re: Jab's Builds! (Snow White! The Evil Queen! Pinocchio! Chernabog!)

Post by HalloweenJack » Tue Aug 21, 2018 9:31 pm

Dumbo is my second favorite Disney animated movie. I really dug it when I was a kid because I was totes mental for anything animal related. I used to watch nature documentaries all the time, and hey Disney did a lot of those didn't they? Those poor lemmings though.....


Anywho, I still like it, probably more today than I did as a kid. I really like the "Be nice to those who are different" vibe it has, because well...I was different than most kids growing up and even into adulthood. Eastern Kentucky was not a great place to grow up as a nerd. If you showed any interest in things like reading or non-sport things like comics, you were ostracized at the very least or dealt with flat out abuse at the worst. I still remember when I was a freshman in high school, getting off the bus to come home and one of the lesser primates on there chucking a bottle at me. It missed and hit my neighbor's car, but man....not a good environment. Living in El Paso for a year was MUCH better to me. People were flat out friendlier and more into the things I liked. And difference didn't really come up very often. My two best friends at school were a white kid and a Hispanic kid, and on base at Ft. Bliss where we lived my best friends were three brothers who lived across the street who were...brothas. The only kind of grief I got in Texas was from the wannabe gangbangers, and even then rarely because they were wannabes and a even few of them were "ah naw man, he's cool. Leave him be".

But I always remember that line from Timothy the mouse when the elephants are making fun of Dumbo's ears and he's all "What's WRONG with his ears?". That always stuck out to me and helped me (along with advice from the Big J) to try and treat people the way I'd want to be treated.

It was also kinda funny in that Dumbo along with Son of Godzilla were two movies we had on the same Betamax (shut up) tape when I was a toddler. My parents would pop that sucker in the Betamax (again shut up) and play it for me over and over while they would work on building our new house. I'd watch both of them and then go yell for my parents and one of them would rewind it and I'd watch it again. You could say they were letting the TV raise me, but they also knew that if I had something like that to watch or years later a book to read, and I'd be watching or reading.

Maybe it was intentional on their part that I watch those. One had strong themes about a mother and the other a father. Maybe it a coincidence....or possibly Memphis.

Anyway, one of my favorite memories of my mother stems from this time and it tends to get me misty. I still remember it but this had to be 33 years ago or more. I was sick and in misery, and mom came over to me and wrapped me up in a blanket that my grandma had made (which I still have) like the way Mrs. Jumbo wrapped Dumbo up in his ears, and she sang Baby Mine to me. Misting up as I type it.


and on that note, I found this a few years ago and it combines the feelings I have about both of those movies and is kind of ironic in a way that they'd be mashed up like this.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ChYg2wYDwFg



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Re: Jab's Builds! (Snow White! The Evil Queen! Pinocchio! Chernabog!)

Post by Jabroniville » Tue Aug 21, 2018 10:59 pm

HJ, you are winning my thread SO HARD. Goddamn dude.

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Bambi (Film)

Post by Jabroniville » Tue Aug 21, 2018 11:00 pm

Image
Image

BAMBI (1942):
Written by:
Felix Salten (book), Larry Morey, Perce Pearce & Gustaf Tenggren

Bambi is one of the most famous and influential films of all time- never before had animals been animated to this level of skill (compare the deer seen in Snow White to the ones seen in this film), and the cutesy way in which they were depicted (with giant eyes and large foreheads to make them look more baby-like) set off numerous creators, including the early names behind Anime & Manga, who would forever adopt the "Big Eyes Small Mouth" style as a near-universal cultural trend in Japan.

It differs from the other films in that it's basically a bunch of stuff about cute animals being cute and endearing. There's very little conflict at all, as you see Bambi grow up and learn how to do things, live like an animal, and meet girl animals. And then... every kid in the world has their first moment of movie-driven heartbreak. Oddly, I must have been too old when I first saw this, because while I was empathetic, I wasn't beside myself like a lot of people apparently get when the Hunter kills ol' Bambi's mom (oh sorry- SPOILER ALERT!!). Never mind that, as the Nostalgia Critic notes, they literally go straight from "Your mother cannot be with you any more" (god I still remember that line from when I was seven years old- clearly that shit stuck with me) to the happy little ditty of April Showers. Bambi meets his dad (who really is kind of a deadbeat until the end, when you think about it), and the whole thing pulls a Lion King (or should I say, Lion King pulled a Bambi) with the circle of life playing out.

Curiously, like a lot of now-famous and beloved Disney films, it was a financial failure when it came out, due to the enormous cost of doing all of this slow-going animal-based stuff. The kind of technology and skill to make realistic animals just DID NOT EXIST at this time, so it took a ton of expense to make it work. It recouped the losses in a re-release in 1947 (ie. after World War II, when European theatres were more open to playing the film), and still went on to be known as an all-time classic.

I actually had to look up what the hell Bambi was as a book, showing just how much cultural cache Disney's version had. Turns out that Bambi- A Life In The Woods was a smash hit from a German writer in 1923, meaning the movie's the equivalent of making a film of a book from, like, 1998 as a Disney Animated Feature today. It's kind of weird- we associate Disney with always going for Fairy Tales and ancient folk tales and the like (Rapunzel, Snow White, The Frog Prince, etc.), but Bambi was literally only about twenty years old when they based one of the very first Disney Features off of it.

Reception and Cultural Impact:
-Bambi was mostly beloved (though some found the lack of Fantasy elements to be a downgrade), and has gone on to become one of the most famous cultural touchstones in history- the first movie many people can remember that made them cry. Bambi's mother dying is an EXTREMELY famous, iconic moment, and pretty much unsurpassed on that level. Animaniacs used it as a gag fifty years later, for God's sake! People STILL crack jokes about hunters and hunting using this story today! Though one amusing thingBambi himself is somewhat infamous as a symbol of wussiness- the ultra-feminine name makes him hard to take seriously, even though he whups some ass by the end of the film. Many of the side characters are very famous- Thumper most especially. He's arguably the first "For The Laughs" Sidekick in Disney History, being cutesy, funny and ultra-cute. You can see a lot of Flounder, Abu and others in the guy- he's mischievous and large-eyed, but ultimately likeable

The story's considered a bit anti-hunting, and pro-environmentalist, as not only to unseen hunters kill Bambi's mother, but they get the forest burnt down- this is MUCH more prominent in the novel, apparently. The villain of the story, usually called "Man", is arguably the most infamous unseen character in movies. The most infamous of all of Disney's Unnecessary Straight-To-Video Sequels is the apocalyptic Bambi 2, initially used as a JOKE on Saturday Night Live as if it were the most blasphemous example of Sequelitis possible... and Disney ACTUALLY MADE IT! Funnily enough, there WAS a sequel to Bambi in book form (dealing with his twin children), but Bambi 2 is actually a prequel featuring Bambi being raised by his uncertain, unsure father, The Great Prince of the Forest. The DVD sold well, but was poorly-received, largely because of the very CONCEPT of making a sequel to a movie from 19-friggin'-42- one of Disney's most hallowed offerings.

Bambi, for obvious reasons, doesn't have much of an impact on the Disney Parks. You really can't fit a human being into a "Bambi" costume and have it look right. I believe there's been a Thumper "Head Character" before, though. No rides feature the gang, either.

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Bambi (Character)

Post by Jabroniville » Wed Aug 22, 2018 12:35 am

Image

BAMBI (Adult)
Played By:
Bobby Stewart, Donnie Dunagan, Hardie Albright & John Sutherland (successive ages)
Role: The Hero, Cute Baby Animal, Grown-Up Bad-Ass
PL 6 (65)
STRENGTH
4 STAMINA 4 AGILITY 3
FIGHTING 5 DEXTERITY 0
INTELLIGENCE 0 AWARENESS 0 PRESENCE 2

Skills:
Athletics 4 (+8)
Close Combat (Antlers) 2 (+7)
Expertise (Survival) 4 (+4)
Intimidation 3 (+5, +6 Growth)
Perception 5 (+5)
Stealth 4 (+2 Size)

Advantages:
Great Endurance, Improved Critical (Antlers)

Powers:
"Animal Senses" Senses 3 (Acute Scent, Low-Light Vision, Radius Sight) [3]
"Animal Physiology" Speed 2 [2]
"Antlers" Strength-Damage +1 (Feats: Reach) [2]

"Natural Size" Growth 2 (Str & Sta +2, +2 Mass, +1 Intimidation, -1 Dodge/Parry, -2 Stealth) -- (8 feet) (Feats: Innate) (Extras: Permanent +0) [5]

Offense:
Unarmed +2 (+4 Damage, DC 19)
Antlers +7 (+5 Damage, DC 20)
Initiative +3

Defenses:
Dodge +5 (DC 15), Parry +7 (DC 17), Toughness +4, Fortitude +6, Will +6

Complications:
Disabled (Animal)- Deer cannot speak to humans, nor use their hooves to easily manipulate objects.
Responsibility (The Rut)- During mating season, males of the Cervidae Family will go all-out in competing with each other for the ladies. These take the form of brutal head-butting contests that leave them exhausted, and some dead. Bambi has to kick some buck's ass and throw him into a river just to get close to his lifelong girlfriend (would she have left him if the other guy won?).
Enemy (Man)- When Man enters the forest, all the animals flee.

Total: Abilities: 28 / Skills: 22--11 / Advantages: 2 / Powers: 12 / Defenses: 12 (65)

-Deer were much more iconic back in the day, where they showed up all over Heraldry and in European mythology, but these days, people care a lot less. Maybe because now we've got National Geographic and Animal Planet, and we can see lots of the REALLY cool animals out there, something like this just doesn't seem so special- they're pretty much THE prey animal for the Wolves & Bears of the world in fiction and reality, so you don't see them as protagonists or major animals in any body of work other than "Bambi" and "Princess Mononoke".

-Deer Stags are powerful, dangerous creatures, but much less so than many other animal species, especially the predators that hunt them. Like most animals, they're heavily vulnerable to ranged attacks, which is why they're comparatively easy prey for hunters and their guns. They're PL 4 when faced by super-heroes or D&D characters or the like, but normal varieties are merely PL 1-2: enough to be dangerous to humans (check Youtube for clips of deer turning the tables on the men hunting them), but not overly so. This build represents one of the larger varieties, though easily handles the Red Deer, White-tailed Deer (ie. Bambi's subspecies), and Fallow Deer, among others. Basically, if you need a smaller Cervid, use this build.

-A large portion of African Antelopes use these same stats as well (though they might be faster)- The Gemsbok, Oryx, Greater Kudu and others fit this build.

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Re: Bambi (Film)

Post by Spectrum » Wed Aug 22, 2018 12:54 am

Jabroniville wrote:
Tue Aug 21, 2018 11:00 pm
I actually had to look up what the hell Bambi was as a book, showing just how much cultural cache Disney's version had. Turns out that Bambi- A Life In The Woods was a smash hit from a German writer in 1923, meaning the movie's the equivalent of making a film of a book from, like, 1998 as a Disney Animated Feature today. It's kind of weird- we associate Disney with always going for Fairy Tales and ancient folk tales and the like (Rapunzel, Snow White, The Frog Prince, etc.), but Bambi was literally only about twenty years old when they based one of the very first Disney Features off of it.
How old is Big Hero 6 in comic book form?
We rise from the ashes so that new legends can be born.

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Re: Bambi (Character)

Post by Ken » Wed Aug 22, 2018 1:00 am

Jabroniville wrote:
Wed Aug 22, 2018 12:35 am
-Deer were much more iconic back in the day, where they showed up all over Heraldry and in European mythology, but these days, people care a lot less. Maybe because now we've got National Geographic and Animal Planet, and we can see lots of the REALLY cool animals out there, something like this just doesn't seem so special- they're pretty much THE prey animal for the Wolves & Bears of the world in fiction and reality, so you don't see them as protagonists or major animals in any body of work other than "Bambi" and "Princess Mononoke".

-Deer Stags are powerful, dangerous creatures, but much less so than many other animal species, especially the predators that hunt them. Like most animals, they're heavily vulnerable to ranged attacks, which is why they're comparatively easy prey for hunters and their guns. They're PL 4 when faced by super-heroes or D&D characters or the like, but normal varieties are merely PL 1-2: enough to be dangerous to humans (check Youtube for clips of deer turning the tables on the men hunting them), but not overly so. This build represents one of the larger varieties, though easily handles the Red Deer, White-tailed Deer (ie. Bambi's subspecies), and Fallow Deer, among others. Basically, if you need a smaller Cervid, use this build.
"Other Ken" is very happy about having a doe and a few fawns living on or near his property. Whenever he sees them out in his yard he cheers up. I have an uncle who used to go deer hunting in... I think it was, Montana, annually. He lives in Florida. He's killed quite a few deer. He has their heads stuffed in his office. I know he and his family ate venison a lot. I just never figured out how they got the deer carcass back to Florida. My best guess is that he simply brought it aboard the plane as part of his carrion luggage.

Me? I haven't killed as many as my deer uncle. But I've killed several, at least four. The difference is Jay uses a Winchester rifle. I used a Honda Accord. Actually a few of them (I had one car that was almost-but-not-quite totalled twice; the insurance company had the car rebuilt; twice.) I had co-workers who wanted to get me a "the buck stops here sticker for my front bumper. The weirdest time was when I saw a herd of a dozen deer ahead of me, crossing the road. I was trying to slow down to stop, but a few of the deer were stragglers. And the last one, I actually caught mid-lope. It completely missed the front end of my car as the front-end went under it. But then something brown and furry came right through the windshield. Then it rolled off the hood and ran off, presumably to die from its injuries.

Deer are scary. And I sometime chanted "I killed Bambi's mom."
Does a Winnie poo in the 100-acre wood?

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Re: Bambi (Character)

Post by M4C8 » Wed Aug 22, 2018 1:16 am

Ken wrote:
Wed Aug 22, 2018 1:00 am
Jabroniville wrote:
Wed Aug 22, 2018 12:35 am
-Deer were much more iconic back in the day, where they showed up all over Heraldry and in European mythology, but these days, people care a lot less. Maybe because now we've got National Geographic and Animal Planet, and we can see lots of the REALLY cool animals out there, something like this just doesn't seem so special- they're pretty much THE prey animal for the Wolves & Bears of the world in fiction and reality, so you don't see them as protagonists or major animals in any body of work other than "Bambi" and "Princess Mononoke".

-Deer Stags are powerful, dangerous creatures, but much less so than many other animal species, especially the predators that hunt them. Like most animals, they're heavily vulnerable to ranged attacks, which is why they're comparatively easy prey for hunters and their guns. They're PL 4 when faced by super-heroes or D&D characters or the like, but normal varieties are merely PL 1-2: enough to be dangerous to humans (check Youtube for clips of deer turning the tables on the men hunting them), but not overly so. This build represents one of the larger varieties, though easily handles the Red Deer, White-tailed Deer (ie. Bambi's subspecies), and Fallow Deer, among others. Basically, if you need a smaller Cervid, use this build.
"Other Ken" is very happy about having a doe and a few fawns living on or near his property. Whenever he sees them out in his yard he cheers up. I have an uncle who used to go deer hunting in... I think it was, Montana, annually. He lives in Florida. He's killed quite a few deer. He has their heads stuffed in his office. I know he and his family ate venison a lot. I just never figured out how they got the deer carcass back to Florida. My best guess is that he simply brought it aboard the plane as part of his carrion luggage.

Me? I haven't killed as many as my deer uncle. But I've killed several, at least four. The difference is Jay uses a Winchester rifle. I used a Honda Accord. Actually a few of them (I had one car that was almost-but-not-quite totalled twice; the insurance company had the car rebuilt; twice.) I had co-workers who wanted to get me a "the buck stops here sticker for my front bumper. The weirdest time was when I saw a herd of a dozen deer ahead of me, crossing the road. I was trying to slow down to stop, but a few of the deer were stragglers. And the last one, I actually caught mid-lope. It completely missed the front end of my car as the front-end went under it. But then something brown and furry came right through the windshield. Then it rolled off the hood and ran off, presumably to die from its injuries.

Deer are scary. And I sometime chanted "I killed Bambi's mom."
I think I read that Deer are responsible for more deaths in the US than any other animal.

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