Mister B's :: more ARevised stuff.

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Re: Mister B's :: Riddick & The Atomik League

Post by Woodclaw » Sat Mar 03, 2018 1:16 pm

Jabroniville wrote:
Sat Mar 03, 2018 11:42 am
Are you the guy who statted a bunch of board folk all those years ago? Like Libra was the Silver Surfer or something? I remember that from long ago :).
I think that was BGIII, later on other people did the same.
"You're right. Sorry. Holy shit," I breathed, "heckhounds.”

WareHouse W (main build thread for M&M)

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Re: Mister B's :: Riddick & The Atomik League

Post by MisterB » Sat Mar 03, 2018 2:16 pm

No, I only started a small number of people. I forget who did do that.

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Re: Mister B's :: Riddick & The Atomik League

Post by MisterB » Sun Mar 04, 2018 3:34 pm

Woodclaw wrote:
Sat Mar 03, 2018 1:16 pm
Jabroniville wrote:
Sat Mar 03, 2018 11:42 am
Are you the guy who statted a bunch of board folk all those years ago? Like Libra was the Silver Surfer or something? I remember that from long ago :).
I think that was BGIII, later on other people did the same.
Yeah I'm pretty sure that BG was the one.

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Re: Mister B's :: Riddick & The Atomik League

Post by Thorpocalypse » Sun Mar 04, 2018 4:53 pm

Man, I forgot about those Atomik League builds, B. That's a great build. Only one nitpick:

...Should have Attractive 2. ;)

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Re: Mister B's :: Riddick & The Atomik League

Post by MisterB » Sun Mar 04, 2018 8:31 pm

Haha, consider it a Retcon ;)

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Design Diary: Skill level

Post by MisterB » Fri Mar 09, 2018 2:50 pm

Skill Ranks in 3E.
The skill system in 3E is slightly different from the 2E rules. Where before the highest skill rank possible was the Power Level +5. In 3e the maximum skill ranks for characters is the Power Level of the Campaign +10, but this includes the characters ability rank as well. I wanted to create this system to show the skill ranks of Normal Individuals. The range ends up changing when we introduce super-powered individuals.

So lets try and break it down, an average person can range anywhere from -1 to 2 in their ability ranks. And in the most optimum conditions, the average person has a +5 circumstance bonus when performing their jobs because they can take their time. But this isn’t always the case, some jobs you will need the right tools in the right place at the right time. So the average person will have a +2 circumstance bonus instead of his Expertise.

So if we continue on this thinking, we can now look at some of the NPC’s created in the Core DCA Book. The Bystander, which has a +0 in every category, and an expertise of 4 for whatever job that they possess. So when we put this all together, the citizen has a total bonus of +6 to +9 when it comes to performing his job!. Which means a normal person can succeed at any routine check (DC 15), without having to Roll. The citizen is PL 0, so his limit is a total of 10. So we can safely learn our skill rank range for most normal people. Which we will keep to 1-10 for simplicity sake, the reason why I wanted to do this was to show what the raw skill ranks mean to the Normal person.

1-2 ranks shows a basic level of profession, ranging from a hobbyist to someone who knows what they are doing. They just haven’t had the opportunity to turn it into job experience.
3-4 ranks shows a professional level of skill, showing that the player has turned his knowledge to his benefit and can make a living at it.
5-6 ranks shows an Expert level in your chosen profession. These people are good enough at their job, that they can be known for it. They have spent several years in their profession.
7-8 ranks shows that the player is an Artisan in his profession, these folks are truly skilled individuals. And have spent ten years or longer, in their profession. Of course, time isn’t always a factor, the person still has to improve himself. Two NPC’s can be entirely different, one has spent 10 years on his job and only has Rank 5 in his skill. But the other one who has applied himself has 8 Ranks in his skill.
9-10 ranks shows that the player is one of the best at what he does, a Master at what he does. And has been doing it for a very long time. Anything above this shows that the player's skill is truly legendary.


Combat Skills?
Now naturally this cannot relate very well, Think of it like this. Fighting is your old Base Attack Bonus in 2E, the advantages stay the same as they do with their related feats. Close Combat and Ranged Combat. But when you get to skills, most players will be scratching your head. Don't make the same mistake I have made, and tons of others. And start using skills to simulate all your other combat, before you get to feats. Because of think of your combat skills in 3E, like the attack specialization feat from 2E. It works great when you want to show your better at a sword, or casting your spells etc.. But if you rely too heavily on the skills aspect, you greatly lose out overall in anything else. So remember that Dexterity is your application for ranged attacks, while Fighting is for melee combat. Once you have the right framework, I think people can ballpark their own estimations. But the chart up above can still apply well enough, if you add your base Fighting or Dexterity score, plus any advantages, and any combat skills.


Super Hero Settings and Skill rank Limits
But what happens when you introduce the higher Power Levels, anything above Power level 8? For this, I took the Batman as a perfect example. His Power Level is 12, setting the new Skill Rank limit which in this case is 22. Remember this includes the ability modifiers of any character, we subtract five from this total to represent the highest level of a Normal Human Range (though they can according to the system can go up to 7). This leaves the limit of 17 if we subtract the highest level of circumstantial modifiers, which is 5. This leaves us with a range of 12 to 14. The range of the raw skill ranks changes ever so slightly, and which I have for simplicity sake have broken into increments of 3, instead of the normal 2.

1-3 ranks show a basic level of the profession, ranging from a hobbyist to someone who knows what they are doing. They just haven’t had the opportunity to turn it into job experience.
4-6 ranks show a professional level of skill, showing that the player has turned his knowledge to his benefit and can make a living at it.
7-9 ranks show an Expert level in your chosen profession. These people are good enough at their job, that they can be known for it. They have spent several years in their profession.
10-12 ranks show that the player is an Artisan in his profession, these folks are truly skilled individuals. And have spent ten years or longer, in their profession. Of course, time isn’t always a factor, the person still has to improve himself. Two NPC’s can be entirely different, one has spent 10 years on his job and only has Rank 5 in his skill. But the other one who has applied himself has 8 Ranks in his skill.
13+ ranks show that the player is one of the best at what he does, a Master at what he does. And has been doing it for a very long time. Anything above this shows that the player's skill is truly legendary.


Optional Skill Rules
Because 3e dropped certain advantages that relied on skills, I wanted to re-introduce them into the system.
Skil Focus/Niche (Ranked): Skill Focus is a two ranked Advantage. The first rank provides a +2 bonus to a specific use of that skill, while the second rank provides a +5 bonus to a specific use of that skill.
Last edited by MisterB on Thu Mar 15, 2018 8:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Design Diary: Heavy Ordinance

Post by MisterB » Fri Mar 09, 2018 2:53 pm

These are all the weapons I could find through different source books so I thought I would put them together. Though the Area (burst)s and Nuclear Hardware are my own research and design, they may not be completely accurate. But I think they might come close. But part of me wants to change a lot of the damages for heavy weapons, and Anti-Tank weapons, and perhaps Area (burst)s many of them don’t make much sense.


Miscellaneous Weapons
Destroyer Class Heavy Guns (Blast 10, Area (burst) 8)
Battle Ship Massive Gun Batteries (Blast 13, Area (burst) 9)
Ballistic Missile (Blast 15, Area (burst) 10- Much higher with a Nuclear Warhead)
Torpedoes (Blast 8, Area (burst) 10) - Found on Submarines
Mini Rocket (Blast 9, Area (burst) 6) - Usually Found on Helicopters
Air-to-Air Missiles (Blast 11, Area (burst) 8, Homing 6)
Air to Ground Bombs (Blast 12+, Area (burst) 6)

Machine Guns
Light Machine Gun (+5 blast, ballistic, multiattack)
Med. Machine Gun (+6 blast, ballistic, multiattack)
Heavy Machine Gun (+7 blast, Ballistic, multiattack)

Heavy Weapons
Anti-tank rocket (+9 blast, Area (burst))
Light Mortar (+5 blast, Area (burst))
Medium Mortar (+7 blast, Area (burst))
Heavy mortar (+9 blast, Area (burst))

Anti Tank Guns
Light Anti-tank Gun (+7 blast, penetrating, burst 4)
Med. Anti-Tank Gun (+8 blast, penetrating, burst 5)
Heavy Anti-tank Gun (+9 blast, penetrating, burst 6)

Field Artillery
Light Field Artillery (+8 blast, Area (burst), Extended Range)
Med. Field Artillery (+9 blast, Area (burst) 2, Extended Range)
Heavy Field Artillery (+10 blast, Area (burst) 3, Extended Range)

Mines
Anti Personal Mine (+8 damage, Area (burst) 4)
Anti -Tank (m-kill; +10 damage, Area (burst) 5)
Anti -Tank (K-kill; +12 damage, Area (burst) 6 (assume 20 kilograms of Area (burst)))

Explosives
½ Pound of Dynamite (+5 damage, Area (burst))
½ Kilo of Dynamite (+6 damage, Area (burst))
½ Kilo of Plastique (+7 damage, Area (burst))
1 Kilogram (+8 damage, Area (burst) 2)
10 Kilograms (+11 damage, Area (burst) 5)
20 Kilograms (+12 damage, Area (burst) 6)

Nuclear Weapons
Tactical Nuclear Missile (+15 blast, Area (burst) 12, Improved Range) .01 Kilotons
B61 Nuclear Bomb (+15 to +19 blast, Area (burst) 12*) .3-160 kilotons
Hiroshima’s Little Boy (+19 blast, Area (burst) 12) 12-15 Kilotons
Nagasaki’s Fat Man (+20 blast, Area (burst) 12) 20-22 Kilotons
W76 Warhead (+22 blast, Area (burst) 13) 100 kilotons
W87 Warhead (+23 blast, Area (burst) 13) 300 kilotons
W88 Warhead & Ivy King (+24 blast, Area (burst) 13) 475 Kilotons
Orange Herald (+25 blast, Area (burst) 13) 700 kilotons
B83 Nuclear Bomb (+26 blast, Area (burst) 14) 1200 Kilotons/1 Megaton
B53 Nuclear Bomb (+28 blast, Area (burst) 14) 9000 Kilotons/9 Megatons
Castle Bravo Device (+29 blast, Area (burst) 14) 15,000 Kilotons/15 Megatons
EK17/MK-17, EC 24/MK-24 & B41 (+30 blast, Area (burst) 15) 25,00 kilotons/25 Megatons
Tsar Bomba (+31 blast, Area (burst) 15) 50,000 Kilotons/50 Megatons

More Nuclear Weaponry:
The Tomahawk Land Attack Missile.
The Tomahawk comes in two varieties, and are either mounted on submarines or on cruisers.
- BLU-97B Warhead (Blast 17, Area (burst) 12, Extended Range) + Weaken 5 (toughness)
- Nuclear Warhead (Blast 18, Area (burst) 13, Extended Range)

Cluster Bombs
The cluster bomb listed here is the kind that scatters land mines. After the Afghanistan incident, that cluster bombs were banned.
Blast 13 [Area (burst) 2 ] for the initial blast. Leaving a field of explosive debri that causes another rank 8 explosive.

BLU-82B “The Daisy Cutter”
Blast 14 [Area (burst) x6]
Last edited by MisterB on Thu Mar 15, 2018 11:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Design Diary: Power Level

Post by MisterB » Fri Mar 09, 2018 2:55 pm

Power Level Benchmarks
I decided to start with my Power Level Benchmarks once more, and I'm gonna try and it it into the 1-20 range. I have broken the tier's into 3 specific categories, though there is a fourth. Anything above level 20 is going to be really difficult. I am going to do my best, to categorize everything using this chart.

PL 1-3: Most Humans
PL 4-5: Skilled Humans
PL 6-7: Highly Skilled Humans, Low Level Super heroes
PL 8-10: Exceptionally Skilled Humans, Moderate Level superheroes
PL 11-12: Exemplars, Elites , Paragons, Greater Level Suerheoes
PL 13-14: Legendary Super Heroes
PL 15-16: Low Level Cosmic
PL 17-19: Moderate Level Cosmic
PL 20-22: Greater Level Cosmic
PL 23-25: Fundamental Powers
Last edited by MisterB on Thu Mar 15, 2018 7:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Design Diary: Substance Toughness

Post by MisterB » Fri Mar 09, 2018 2:57 pm

Eyeballing It
In general an item has a toughness based on what its made out of. This should allow many to gauge it's substance toughness with some accuracy. Though a GM is well within his rights to let an item be up to 3 ranks greater in toughness, for say maybe Enchanted Items, of very High Tech items. Though there are times you may not be able to just eyeball it. So I have included my own house rule, for devices that don't fit in the usual (especially the very costly).

My quick rule for Devices is this.
Simply divide your device cost by 10, rounding up or down. The GM may decide just like under eyeballing to let the player increase this by up to 3 ranks, or simply raise this to a substance toughness of 10. Or both depending on the nature of the Device in question.

• If we took hawkeye's bow it would have a toughness of 8, but it's been stated on the marvel wikia, that he uses a reinforced bow thats as strong as steel. So thus it has a toughness of 9.

• If I were to take my recent Iron Man Build, (147 / 10) = a Toughness of 15 (18 if I "eye ball it" ). Not too shabby if you ask me.

• The standard battle suit template out of the core book, would have a toughness of 8 (though the judge might want to bump this to 10; Or "eye ball it" to 13).

Play around with it, and see what works for you. But this is what I do.

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Rule Variant: Holding your breath

Post by MisterB » Fri Mar 09, 2018 2:59 pm

I wanted to incoporate a different set of rules, to contend with characters that had super human stamina. Who seem to be able to hold their breath for extended or indefinite periods of time. Though holding your breath is an incredibly cheap power. Some might not want to purchase it, and just rely on their extremely high stamina. Which in my opinion, is cheapened greatly in 3rd Edition.

Variant Holding your Breath Rules
A player can hold his breath for a certain amount of time, per normal rules (10 rounds + 2 rounds for every point of stamina possessed). A player can expend Extra effort to double this duration, this is the same thing as preparing to hold your breath, ie Taking in a deep breath, performing a special breathing exercise. But this can only be done once, and has to be decided before attempting to hold their breath.

After this time is expended the character must start making a DC 10 fortitude check to continue holding their breath for each round there after. The DC continues to grow worse, for each round the character continues to hold their breath. After which the character is Incapacitated. Then on the round after that, the player is considered dying. The player needs to start breathing again to recover from a Dying condition.

Options Rules or Ideas:
· Brain Damage. Those that reach a dying condition, but recover. May suffer from a brain damage complication, which Impaires your Intellect score. A player can spend a hero point to counter this, but there is no other way to heal from this conditional complication, unless the hero has Regeneration with the Persistent advantage. Or gets healed with a restorative healing effect.
· High Stamina. A GM may wish once stamina reaches a certain point, to let hero's hold their breath beyond these rules. Say a Stamina of 9 or higher (up to the GM ). Players could hold their breath for an amount of time equal to their stamina - 2 on the time scale. Extra effort could improve this per usual rules. But either way, once the duration is reached to follow the rules as normal.

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Re: Mister B's :: Design Diaries and Rule Variants

Post by MisterB » Sat Mar 10, 2018 5:46 am

I think most people would remember I used to do B uild requests. And mad a few very creative amalgam characters. And I think I was the first to really start doing fanatsy builds, and made the d&d 3.5 to m&m conversion system. And of course my very original millennium verse setting. I converted quite a few TV shows as well.
I was very random I guess lol

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Re: Mister B's :: Design Diaries and Rule Variants

Post by Thorpocalypse » Tue Mar 13, 2018 1:49 am

MisterB wrote:
Sat Mar 10, 2018 5:46 am
I think most people would remember I used to do B uild requests. And mad a few very creative amalgam characters. And I think I was the first to really start doing fanatsy builds, and made the d&d 3.5 to m&m conversion system. And of course my very original millennium verse setting. I converted quite a few TV shows as well.
I was very random I guess lol
Aren't we all... ;)

I like these benchmarks, Mr. B.

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Design Diary: Converting DnD to Mnm

Post by MisterB » Tue Mar 13, 2018 3:01 pm

Image

** Do not include Shield bonuses.
*** This bonus is added onto a weapons ( or shields) normal ranks. So a +2 sword that does 1d8 damage in D&D does Rank 4 damage in M&M.

Fighting Score & Ranged Combat: I usually base this off the creatures HD or Base Attack bonus which ever is lower. And I usually assume that their ranged combat, is 2/3rds this value.

Converting Multi Classed Characters: To find the true Hit Dice value before converting. Take your highest level class as your base. Then for every 3 levels in other classes add 1 to this.

Greater HitDice: Some monsters/classes use a D10 or a D12 for their hitdice. To represent their increased potentials. Grant them either Increased Stamina, or the protection power. D10 is 1 rank, D12 is 2 ranks.

Damage Reduction: Use the last column on the chart above for converting into Impervious ratings. I've decided for converting Damage Resistance to specific attacks. Should a monster have a DR of 20 or greater, the GM can opt to just give the creature half save immunities to the specific resistances. DR's of 40 or higher against specific attacks, can be full Immunities. But this is up to you. The main reason to keep there from being incredibly high Impervious ratings.

Skill Ranks: Treat skill ranks like "levels" before converting into Ranks in M&M, than modify that by the characters Ability Modifiers. This will give you the true Modifier of their skills.

Saving Throws to Defense: Since saving throws can get out of hand in D&D in extreme proportions. Ive decided to treat these like "levels" before converting to a rank. This is assumed to be the full defense rating after ability modifiers. Reflexes become Dodge, Will to Will, Fort to Fort. Parry should always be based off the converted characters Fighting score.

Making Spells Generic?: A quick rule, to converting spells. If you don't want to convert a bunch of spells into the game. Do this. The player has an aray of points equal to their caster level x 2. And has a number of spells 1/4th the amount of total spells castable (except for the 0 level spells).

Power / Magic Resistance: For the most part, this is often dropped when converting. Considering that everyone gets a save regardless. I suggest if you want to include some form of resistance from D&D over, try this. Those who have a resistance rating of 20 or higher, Give them a feature, with a +5 save vs. the particular descriptor or a limited impervious defense. . Anything higher consider a 1/2 save Immunity against the particular type.

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Re: Mister B's :: Design Diaries and Rule Variants

Post by MisterB » Tue Mar 13, 2018 5:25 pm

I have added two new games to my indie rpg library, Chronicles of aerth, and Forge Engine, you can look these up on Rpgnow.com . I'm rather excited in perhaps doing builds for these.

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Design Diary: The Wizard

Post by MisterB » Wed Mar 14, 2018 2:01 am

The Power of Magic
The power of the Magic, has always carried with it a love for the fantasy. Which is in it's essence apart of the fantasy Troupe. Magic wielders can come in a variety of “Types” but this particular thread, is only going to detail the “Wizard” . Wizards generally learned their magic through arduous study, and require books, formula, and gestures to use their spells.


The Wizard Template (9pp)
Ability Requirements (4pp): Wrestling the powers of magic requires a Keen mind, Requiring at least an Intellect of 2.
Defenses (2pp): Most wizards require a powerful will, to fashion the magical forces. So most have a willpower of 2, though fortitude may lack in counter point.
Skills (1pp): Expertise (Arcane; Intellect) 3, Wizards require knowledge more than anything.
Advantages (2pp): Wizards learn several things to be a Wizard: Languages & ritualist. The ability to use ritual magic, and the ability to read and spek in the Academic Language of Wizards. Options advantages include: Speed of Thought (use Intelligence for Initiative), and Artifice.
Concept Restrictions: Accepting the role of wizard, usually has certain restrictions involved with it. Unable to use most weapons, save simple ones. Such as the staff, dagger, club. A crossbow. And armor is all but non-existance, though a wizard could get away from leather armor. Or just wearing the robes as listed below.

Complications:
Power Loss. Generally Wizards have many complications towards spell casting, requiring a focus such as gesture, words, foci (such as wands and staves).
Components. Some spells might require rare or unique materials or Ingredients. This is treated more like a complication then anything. Giving the wizard a hero point during a crucial moment. It's assumed most wizards have what they need on hand.


Defensive Magic:
It's usually very wise for a Wizard to develop their Defensive powers separately from their offensive powers. I like to akin these to the “Buff” effect, often used in computer / console gaming. A Wizard can have one Buff/Defensive ability on at a time, unless he is willing to devote more away from his other abilities. Though creating an array of Defensive abilities, is just as valid. A great way of making different modes or styles of magical play. Defensive powers rarely require a Check Required & Distracting flaw, unless it takes time to utilize. Thus its best for wizards to cast a defensive spell in preparation before combat.
• Magic Shield: This spell's primary defense makes it work just like a shield. Enhancing the wielder's dodge & parry defense.
• Magic Wall: This is essentially just a Forcefield power, and often has Affects Insubstantial added onto it.
• Magic Resistance: This spell's primary defense makes a wielder more resistant to magical attacks. This may be a Enhanced Will Save or Impervious Will Save, or even both! This spell often includes the Affects Insubstantial.
• Shape shifting: Allows the wizard to take another form, and still be able to use their offensive abilities. This can be as simple as a Morph (metamorph) effect, or the actual Shape Shifting power.
• Scrying: A wizard can extend their normal senses, usually visual , or visual and hearing. This is an application of the Remote Sensing Effect with the Feedback Flaw attached to it. This spell may have a limit on it, requiring a medium to work through.
• Mantle of Wisdom. A wizard may use this defensive power, to bolster their willpower. This may provides a bonus to the wizards Awareness ability.

Offensive Magic (Array):
• Magic Blast: The most common offensive spell. The arcane blast, causes mystical damage instead of physical. Meaning you have to use a Will Save Ranged Damage Effect for the arcane blast. Sometimes this spell includes the Affect Insubstantial for more powerful versions of this spell.
• Magic Bolt: Another common spell, though its affects are primarily physical instead of magical. This is simply a Blast power with a force and magical descriptor. More powerful versions of this spell, change the save to a Willpower instead of toughness.
• Magic Missile: Another common spell, that creates a bolt that unnervingly tracks onto a target to. This is the Blast power with a Homing Modifier.
• Charm Spell: This is your typical “mind control ' effect in fantasy. Its an Affliction with the following stages: Entranced, Compelled, and Controlled. More powerful versions have the Increased Duration modifier.
• Conjuration: This is your typical summon item spell. It is a Teleport Spell that affects objects only and Attack Modifiers added to it. More powerful versions of the spell may have an extended range, and accurate modifiers.
• Fire Ball: This spell is common in just about every fantasy scenario possible. Creating a Blast with a Explosion Area.
• Staff Strike: This spell imbues the staff of the wizard with power. This creates a damaging effect with the Penetrating extra; With the removable flaw. More powerful versions, can have the Area Line Extra, the ability to affect Insubstantial creatures.
• Burst of Light: This spell dazzles those within the radius of effect. This is the Dazzle power with the Area (bust), and the Selective Extras added onto it.
• Magic Storm: This spell creates a whirl wind of power around the wizard in question. This energy seethes and crackles, destroying everything in its wake. This is the Damage Effect with the Area (Cloud) and Selective Extras.
• Shatter: This spell destroys mundane items , this is a ranged weaken (toughness) effect, that affects objects only. Remember that magical items have a higher toughness (usually 3 better by default).


Utility Spells:
These spells are often sensory abilities, or unique tricks that are not directly related to combat. Though they might appear within an offensive array, or as part of a magical item.

• Feature: Prestidigitation. Though even more mundane abilities can be mimicked with the use of a Sleight of Hand skill check. This feature allows a wizard, to duplicate these affects with real magic. Conjuring a flower , producing a coin, making dice fall upon specific numbers.
• Detect Magic: This spell is your general detect/analyze magic spell that is most common among both types. Senses: Magic Awareness (Visual; Acute; Sustained)
• Feature: Glowing Orb: The wizard creates a light, that is bright enough to lighten a 30 foot radius. The wizard's spell is often customizable, by color or even the size of the orb.
• Magic Door: The wizard can create a portal from which to move over short distances. Teleport (Extra: Portal )
• Feature: Magic Glyph: This spell creates a magical symbol upon an item in question (that the wizard touches). This allows wizards to detect and identify themselves to other wizards.
• Feature : Mending: This spell allows a wizard to repair broken items back to their original quality, this will not work on destroyed. This is the Transform Effect (broken to repaired; Quirk: Does not effect destroyed items).
• Feature: Close/Open Portal. This spell will open or close a door from a distance of 0. This may be improved for each rank in it. This spell will not open a locked door.
• Feature: Magic Lock/Unlock. This spell will not only enforce a door, but will make it extremely difficulty to unlock and open. Each point in this feature increases the difficulty for others to unlock the item in question by 5. This spell has a distance of 0. A player can dedicate points to “Unlocking” as well. Each rank in this feature reduces the DC by 5. Once the DC reaches 0, the door opens. This means a Rank 4 Unlock spell, will unlock a DC 20 door.


Familiars:
Wizards who wish to have familiars, require spending a certain amount of points. Familiars range in strength from lesser to Greater. Which determines the kinds of abilities that the wizard shares with the familiar in question. You can see my rules about familiars here.

Lesser Familiar Bond (3+ points)
• Minion Advantage . The player must purchase the animal of his type, and add the lesser template onto it.
• Feature: The Bond. This allows the wizard, to communicate on a empathic level with his familiar.
• Feature: Familiar Edge. The type of familiar a wizard has, grants a special bonus thats costs no more than 1 point. Which is related to the animal in question.

Greater Familiar Bond (12+ points)
• Minion Advantage . The player must purchase the animal, and add the Greater Template to its profile.
• Feature: The Bond. This allows the wizard, to communicate on a empathic level with his familiar.
• Feature: Familiar Edge. The type of familiar a wizard has, grants a special bonus thats costs no more than 1 point. Which is related to the animal in question.
• Feature: The Touch. A wizard can share a close ranged power to benefit his familiar instead.
• Familiar's Senses: Remote Sensing 8 (Visual, hearing; Medium (Familiar), Feedback; 8 pps)
Using Fantasy Familiars in 3E
Take any of the animal templates , though many are small or tiny creatures as far as size are concerned, and add the following modifications to their statistics. This is what happens when they become bound with a particular individual. The most typical familiars are : Bat, Cat, hawk, Lizard, Monkey, Owl, Rat, raven, Snake, Toad, and Weasel.

Lesser Familiar
Abilities: Intellect is raised to -2, then gain a +1 bonus to their awareness. (these are adjustments to the animals base stats)
Advantages: All familiar's gain Evasion.
Powers:
Familiar's Pact (multiple powers , treated as one)
• Resilient: Protection 1
• The Bond: Communication 2 (Mental; Limited (to Master), Radius; Cost 8pp)

Having a lesser familiar grants a specific ability to the wizard (which counts as a feature, unless it provides an additional power):
Familiar Features:
Bat. +2 bonus to perception checks using your hearing. + Senses (extended hearing)
Cat. +2 bonus to stealth checks
Hawk. +2 to perception checks using eyesight + Senses (extended vision)
Lizard. +2 bonus to climb checks.
Monkey: +2 bonus to Acrobatics checks.
Owl. +2 bonus to sight based perception checks, + Senses (low light vision)
Rat. +2 bonus to fortitude tests, to resist poison and diseases.
Raven. +2 bonus to Expertise (Appraisal)
Snake. +2 bonus to deception checks.
Toad. +1 bonus to toughness.
Weasel. +2 bonus to Sleight of Hand checks.

Greater Familiar:
These powers are optional for those who desire more powerful Familiars (these are adjustments to the animals scores)
Abilities: Intellect is raised to -1, Awareness is +2
Advantages: Evasion
Powers:
Familiar's Pact (multiple powers , treated as one)
• Resilient: Protection 2
• The Bond: Communication 2 (Mental; Limited (to Master), Radius)


Having a greater familiar grants the following power to the wizard in question as well as the Familiar Features above:
Familiar's Senses: Remote Sensing 8 (Visual, hearing; Medium (Familiar), Feedback; 8 pps) – The Familiar's Senses cannot be greater then the range of the Bond.

Tools of the Trade:
Magic wielders can often be found using many magical items, ranging from potions and scrolls, to magical books, staves, and wands. As well as strange ingredients and components. Some might be considered Devices, or equipment (which are then used with the casting). A GM may open to instead make it harder to cast spells withiout a focus instead of giving the player a bonus to rolls. So it changes from a DC 10, to a DC 15. Basically 5 points higher.

Books/Scrolls. Books and Scrolls can often add a bonus to Expertise Checks with what ever it is they are talking about. And may even have spells within them for the wielder to use. Treat this as a feature, with an additional removable effect (requiring a Arcane array to use properly; making sure only those trained can use those spells.

Magic Wands. Wands are often imbued with powers of their own, and may be considered a focus for casting spells. Improving their DC for Expertise (magic) checks by +2 (treat this as a feature).

Magic Staves. Staves are more powerful versions of wands, not only are they weapons to inflict damage with. They may have power of their own, and allow the wielder to use powers they do not posses (doing the same thing as a book/scroll can do ). As a focus as staff Improves their Expertise Magic checks for casting spells by +5 (treat this as a 2 pt. feature)


Unique Equipment
Wizards Robes. A wizards life is fraught with peril, and the construction of sturdy robes for their defense is essential. A standard robe, provides 1 point of protection. While the best constructed robes, provide 2 points of protection.

Wizards Wand. A wand costs 1 equipment point, and provides the +2 bonus to Expertise Checks when casting spells. And is not very good for using as a weapon.

Wizards Staff. A wizard staff, costs 3 equipment points. It provides a +5 bonus to expertise checks when casting spells, and can be used as a +2 weapon.

Magic Font. A magic font is often used in the off hand, this can be a variety of things from a crytal sphere to a complex mechanism of small size. The font is considered a magical item which grants Enhanced Trait (Dodge) 2. It can also channel extra effects which often boost a wizards normal abilities. Feature: Magic Font. (ranked), free extra effort towards casting a spell.

Orb of Light. This magical stones, allow the person to cast light upon command within a 30 foot radius. Similar to a flashlight in modern times. This costs 1 equipment point.

Robes of the Magi. This is the most common magical item found amongst wizarding types. It allows a wizard to gain a defensive item , beyond the limits of protection 2. Often other abilities have been imparted, such as pockets which allow them to store more than they can carry. This would be a feature of course. And perhaps an Immunity to Environmental factors.

Staff of the Magi. This magical staff comes in a variety of power levels. Depending on the strength of the wizard, it becomes a fashion statement, and a symbol of status.
• Journeyman's Staff. Contains the following: Damage 2; Feature: Glow, focus (as above), and Enhaced Trait (Parry) 1
• Wizard's Staff. Contains the following: Damage 3 (Improved Critical); feature: Glow, Focus (as above), Enhanced Trait (Parry) 2, May contain a feature: which grants an extra alternate effect.
• Staff of the Magi. Contains the following effects: Damage 4 (Improved Critical); Feature: Glow, Focus, Enhanced Trait (Parry) 3, 2 features for extra Alternate Effects.

Crystal ball. This devices, relieves the wizard of having to cast a scrying spell. Granting the Remote Sensing power, often with additional powers such as Dimensional. Being able to read minds through the device in question, even having alternate effects that grant precognition or postcognition.



Casting a Spell
Under optimal conditions, a wizard would never have to make an Expertise Check to see if he succeeds. But in the midst of combat, concentration becomes very important. Which is why casting a spell can be considered very distracting. The player simply makes an Expertise (magic) check against a DC of 10, for every point that you succeed your check by, determines how powerful the spell can be. There are things that can make this difficult too.

• Taking Damage: Increase DC by the Damage Rank
• On the difficult ground: Increase DC by +2 (this could be while riding a horse, on the heaving of the deck of a ship).
• On the dangerous ground: Increased the DC by +5. (Riding a horse at a fast pace. The heavy pitch in stormy seas)
• Impaired/Hindered: Increase the DC by +2. If a wizard has been grabbed or restrained in some fashion.
• Disabled/Immobile: Increased the DC by +5.


Other uses of Expertise (Magic)
A wizard can use Expertise (Magic) for many things.

• Reading Magical Script. Generally, a wizard would never have to read the script he was trained in. But with so many other wizards out there and different orders. Coming across a foreign manuscript might require some study.
• Discerning Spells. A wizard may identify another spell being cast, by making contested Expertise Checks against the Wizard in question.
• Spells on the Fly. A wizard may be required to make an Expertise check, on top of using Extra Effort to cast spells not normally apart from the arsenal. The Difficulty of such spells is a base DC of 15, each point the player succeeds by, allows them to use 1 rank of effect.


Unique Extras & Flaws
Charges [-1 cost per rank; plus a flat cost/charge.] This unique flaw limit how many times a specific power may be used per day. The Initial -1 flaw, grants the character 3 uses. Then the player may increase the number of charges, by paying off the extra. Each additional use increases the cost of the power by 1 point.
Example: A wand that can cast visual Illusions at rank 5. Is worth 10 points. Adding the charges flaw, grants 3 uses, and reduces it to cost of 5 points. But the player wants 5 charges, so adds 2 points to the cost. For a total of 8pp.



Optional Rules
Magical Energy
This unique trait grants the player a pool of points from which to fuel powers. The player has a limited amount of points equal to his power level and Intellect added together. So a PL 6 wizard, with an Intellect of 4. Has 10 points of energy. The wizard can purchase more energy at the expense of 1 energy for each PP spent. Up to the wizards raw ranks in his Expertise: Arcane Skill. And the only way Energy points improve is by raising the Intellect score and Arcane Skill, then spending the appropriate points to your raise your Magical Energy pool. So a PL 6 wizard with an Intellect of 4, and an Arcane Skill of 8, has a maximum pool of 18 energy points.

Each use of a power costs 1 point of energy to cast. Spells which are sustained or continuous, cost an additional point of mana each time to maintain those effects. There are many ways to expand upon this. Energy returns at the rate of 1 point per hour of relaxation, or 2 points per hour of sleep.

New Power: Sanctum
Sanctum. This power allows a person who has turned themselves in, with a particular place. To subtly manipulate the area around them with the Magic of their world. Though a difficult process at best, save for the most strong. This power can manipulate "Environmental/Nature" effects with a Magic Descriptor. Attempting to use it to damage others, can never be "Direct" and is much more difficult to pull off. Examples include:
• Raise/Disperse a fog.
• Control/Strengthen/Diminish Wind.
• Make undergrowth inhibit movement.
• Raise/lower water.
• Cause Flood.
• Improve/Worsen Weather.
Treat this as Variable 5 (Check Required 5: DC 15 - Expertise: Magic, Limited: to the confines of your area ; Quirk: DC is 20 if your trying to duplicate damaging effects)


Power Reserve:
This power gives the player a reserve amount of points, this is often tied to a device or perhaps a specific location (Making it a feature of a Head Quarters; ie such as specially powerful energies of magic). Each Rank gives the player an additional energy point to draw upon , per day. The fact that it is a limited pool of point, restricted to an amount of time, and to either an object or place. Trades off of each other.
Treat this as a feature, with each rank granting an additional energy point.
Last edited by MisterB on Thu Mar 15, 2018 8:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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